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Details for Fire-Prevention and Protection Engineers


Description

Research causes of fires, determine fire protection methods, and design or recommend materials or equipment such as structural components or fire-detection equipment to assist organizations in safeguarding life and property against fire, explosion, and related hazards.

Tasks

  • Design fire detection equipment, alarm systems, and fire extinguishing devices and systems.
  • Inspect buildings or building designs to determine fire protection system requirements and potential problems in areas such as water supplies, exit locations, and construction materials.
  • Advise architects, builders, and other construction personnel on fire prevention equipment and techniques, and on fire code and standard interpretation and compliance.
  • Prepare and write reports detailing specific fire prevention and protection issues such as work performed and proposed review schedules.
  • Determine causes of fires, and ways in which they could have been prevented.
  • Direct the purchase, modification, installation, maintenance, and operation of fire protection systems.
  • Consult with authorities to discuss safety regulations and to recommend changes as necessary.
  • Develop plans for the prevention of destruction by fire, wind, and water.
  • Study the relationships between ignition sources and materials to determine how fires start.
  • Attend workshops, seminars, or conferences to present or obtain information regarding fire prevention and protection.
  • Develop training materials, and conduct training sessions on fire protection.
  • Evaluate fire department performance and the laws and regulations affecting fire prevention or fire safety.
  • Conduct research on fire retardants and the fire safety of materials and devices.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.
  • Experience - A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an accountant must complete four years of college and work for several years in accounting to be considered qualified.

Knowledge

Skills

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Science - Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Learning Strategies - Selecting and using training/instructional methods and procedures appropriate for the situation when learning or teaching new things.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Operations Analysis - Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Systems Analysis - Determining how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect outcomes.
  • Systems Evaluation - Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.

Related Careers

  • Environmental Compliance Inspectors
  • Fire Inspectors
  • Fire Investigators
  • First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Office and Administrative Support Workers
  • Fish and Game Wardens
  • Industrial Safety and Health Engineers
  • Occupational Health and Safety Specialists
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