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Details for Electronics Engineering Technicians


Description

Lay out, build, test, troubleshoot, repair, and modify developmental and production electronic components, parts, equipment, and systems, such as computer equipment, missile control instrumentation, electron tubes, test equipment, and machine tool numerical controls, applying principles and theories of electronics, electrical circuitry, engineering mathematics, electronic and electrical testing, and physics. Usually work under direction of engineering staff.

Tasks

  • Test electronics units, using standard test equipment, and analyze results to evaluate performance and determine need for adjustment.
  • Perform preventative maintenance and calibration of equipment and systems.
  • Read blueprints, wiring diagrams, schematic drawings, and engineering instructions for assembling electronics units, applying knowledge of electronic theory and components.
  • Identify and resolve equipment malfunctions, working with manufacturers and field representatives as necessary to procure replacement parts.
  • Maintain system logs and manuals to document testing and operation of equipment.
  • Assemble, test, and maintain circuitry or electronic components according to engineering instructions, technical manuals, and knowledge of electronics, using hand and power tools.
  • Adjust and replace defective or improperly functioning circuitry and electronics components, using hand tools and soldering iron.
  • Procure parts and maintain inventory and related documentation.
  • Maintain working knowledge of state-of-the-art tools or software by reading or attending conferences, workshops or other training.
  • Provide user applications and engineering support and recommendations for new and existing equipment with regard to installation, upgrades and enhancement.
  • Write reports and record data on testing techniques, laboratory equipment, and specifications to assist engineers.
  • Provide customer support and education, working with users to identify needs, determine sources of problems and to provide information on product use.
  • Design basic circuitry and draft sketches for clarification of details and design documentation under engineers' direction, using drafting instruments and computer aided design (CAD) equipment.
  • Build prototypes from rough sketches or plans.
  • Develop and upgrade preventative maintenance procedures for components, equipment, parts and systems.
  • Fabricate parts, such as coils, terminal boards, and chassis, using bench lathes, drills, or other machine tools.
  • Research equipment and component needs, sources, competitive prices, delivery times and ongoing operational costs.
  • Write computer or microprocessor software programs.
  • Survey satellite receival sites for proper signal level and provide technical assistance in dish location and installation, transporting dishes as necessary.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.

Knowledge

  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

Skills

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Related Careers

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  • Electrical Engineering Technicians
  • Electricians
  • Electronic Drafters
  • Mechanical Drafters
  • Mechanical Engineering Technicians
  • Mechanical Engineers
  • Model Makers, Metal and Plastic
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