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Details for Hydrologists


Description

Research the distribution, circulation, and physical properties of underground and surface waters; study the form and intensity of precipitation, its rate of infiltration into the soil, movement through the earth, and its return to the ocean and atmosphere.

Tasks

  • Study and document quantities, distribution, disposition, and development of underground and surface waters.
  • Draft final reports describing research results, including illustrations, appendices, maps, and other attachments.
  • Coordinate and supervise the work of professional and technical staff, including research assistants, technologists, and technicians.
  • Prepare hydrogeologic evaluations of known or suspected hazardous waste sites and land treatment and feedlot facilities.
  • Design and conduct scientific hydrogeological investigations to ensure that accurate and appropriate information is available for use in water resource management decisions.
  • Study public water supply issues, including flood and drought risks, water quality, wastewater, and impacts on wetland habitats.
  • Collect and analyze water samples as part of field investigations and/or to validate data from automatic monitors.
  • Apply research findings to help minimize the environmental impacts of pollution, water-borne diseases, erosion, and sedimentation.
  • Measure and graph phenomena such as lake levels, stream flows, and changes in water volumes.
  • Investigate complaints or conflicts related to the alteration of public waters, gathering information, recommending alternatives, informing participants of progress, and preparing draft orders.
  • Answer questions and provide technical assistance and information to contractors and/or the public regarding issues such as well drilling, code requirements, hydrology, and geology.
  • Develop or modify methods of conducting hydrologic studies.
  • Install, maintain, and calibrate instruments such as those that monitor water levels, rainfall, and sediments.
  • Evaluate data and provide recommendations regarding the feasibility of municipal projects such as hydroelectric power plants, irrigation systems, flood warning systems and waste treatment facilities.
  • Conduct short-term and long-term climate assessments, and study storm occurrences.
  • Study and analyze the physical aspects of the Earth in terms of the hydrological components, including atmosphere, hydrosphere, and interior structure.
  • Conduct research and communicate information to promote the conservation and preservation of water resources.
  • Design civil works associated with hydrographic activities, and supervise their construction, installation, and maintenance.
  • Review applications for site plans and permits, and recommend approval, denial, modification, or further investigative action.
  • Evaluate research data in terms of its impact on issues such as soil and water conservation, flood control planning, and water supply forecasting.
  • Monitor the work of well contractors, exploratory borers, and engineers, in order to enforce rules regarding their activities.
  • Administer programs designed to ensure the proper sealing of abandoned wells.
  • Compile and evaluate hydrologic information in order to prepare navigational charts and maps, and to predict atmospheric conditions.
  • Investigate properties, origins, and activities of glaciers, ice, snow, and permafrost.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.
  • Experience - A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an accountant must complete four years of college and work for several years in accounting to be considered qualified.

Knowledge

Skills

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Mathematics - Using mathematics to solve problems.
  • Science - Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Learning Strategies - Selecting and using training/instructional methods and procedures appropriate for the situation when learning or teaching new things.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Persuasion - Persuading others to change their minds or behavior.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Systems Analysis - Determining how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect outcomes.
  • Systems Evaluation - Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.

Related Careers

  • Astronomers
  • Atmospheric and Space Scientists
  • Geological Sample Test Technicians
  • Geophysical Data Technicians
  • Geoscientists, Except Hydrologists and Geographers
  • Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians
  • Physicists
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