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Details for Social and Human Service Assistants


Description

Assist professionals from a wide variety of fields, such as psychology, rehabilitation, or social work, to provide client services, as well as support for families. May assist clients in identifying available benefits and social and community services and help clients obtain them. May assist social workers with developing, organizing, and conducting programs to prevent and resolve problems relevant to substance abuse, human relationships, rehabilitation, or adult daycare.

Tasks

  • Provide information and refer individuals to public or private agencies or community services for assistance.
  • Keep records and prepare reports for owner or management concerning visits with clients.
  • Visit individuals in homes or attend group meetings to provide information on agency services, requirements and procedures.
  • Advise clients regarding food stamps, child care, food, money management, sanitation, or housekeeping.
  • Submit reports and review reports or problems with superior.
  • Oversee day-to-day group activities of residents in institution.
  • Interview individuals and family members to compile information on social, educational, criminal, institutional, or drug history.
  • Meet with youth groups to acquaint them with consequences of delinquent acts.
  • Transport and accompany clients to shopping areas or to appointments, using automobile.
  • Explain rules established by owner or management, such as sanitation and maintenance requirements, and parking regulations.
  • Observe and discuss meal preparation and suggest alternate methods of food preparation.
  • Demonstrate use and care of equipment for tenant use.
  • Consult with supervisor concerning programs for individual families.
  • Monitor free, supplementary meal program to ensure cleanliness of facility and that eligibility guidelines are met for persons receiving meals.
  • Observe clients' food selections and recommend alternate economical and nutritional food choices.
  • Inform tenants of facilities, such as laundries and playgrounds.
  • Care for children in client's home during client's appointments.
  • Assist in locating housing for displaced individuals.
  • Assist clients with preparation of forms, such as tax or rent forms.
  • Assist in planning of food budget, using charts and sample budgets.

Interests

  • Social - Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.
  • Experience - A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an accountant must complete four years of college and work for several years in accounting to be considered qualified.

Knowledge

  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Philosophy and Theology - Knowledge of different philosophical systems and religions. This includes their basic principles, values, ethics, ways of thinking, customs, practices, and their impact on human culture.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Sociology and Anthropology - Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • Therapy and Counseling - Knowledge of principles, methods, and procedures for diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of physical and mental dysfunctions, and for career counseling and guidance.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Psychology - Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.

Skills

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.

Related Careers

  • Child, Family, and School Social Workers
  • Occupational Therapists
  • Personal and Home Care Aides
  • Residential Advisors
Wages for this career
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