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Details for Coroners


Description

Direct activities such as autopsies, pathological and toxicological analyses, and inquests relating to the investigation of deaths occurring within a legal jurisdiction to determine cause of death or to fix responsibility for accidental, violent, or unexplained deaths.

Tasks

  • Inventory personal effects, such as jewelry or wallets, that are recovered from bodies.
  • Arrange for the next of kin to be notified of deaths.
  • Record the disposition of minor children, as well as details of arrangements made for their care.
  • Witness and certify deaths that are the result of a judicial order.
  • Perform medico-legal examinations and autopsies, conducting preliminary examinations of the body in order to identify victims, to locate signs of trauma, and to identify factors that would indicate time of death.
  • Inquire into the cause, manner, and circumstances of human deaths, and establish the identities of deceased persons.
  • Direct activities of workers who conduct autopsies, perform pathological and toxicological analyses, and prepare documents for permanent records.
  • Complete death certificates, including the assignment of a cause and manner of death.
  • Observe and record the positions and conditions of bodies and of related evidence.
  • Collect and document any pertinent medical history information.
  • Observe, record, and preserve any objects or personal property related to deaths, including objects such as medication containers and suicide notes.
  • Complete reports and forms required to finalize cases.
  • Interview persons present at death scenes to obtain information useful in determining the manner of death.
  • Testify at inquests, hearings, and court trials.
  • Provide information concerning the circumstances of death to relatives of the deceased.
  • Remove or supervise removal of bodies from death scenes, using the proper equipment and supplies, and arrange for transportation to morgues.
  • Locate and document information regarding the next of kin, including their relationship to the deceased and the status of notification attempts.
  • Confer with officials of public health and law enforcement agencies in order to coordinate interdepartmental activities.
  • Coordinate the release of personal effects to authorized persons, and facilitate the disposition of unclaimed corpses and personal effects.
  • Collect wills, burial instructions, and other documentation needed for investigations and for handling of the remains.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.

Knowledge

Skills

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Science - Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Related Careers

  • Dietitians and Nutritionists
  • First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Animal Husbandry and Animal Care Workers
  • Forensic Science Technicians
  • Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists
  • Optometrists
Wages for this career
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