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Details for Archivists


Description

Appraise, edit, and direct safekeeping of permanent records and historically valuable documents. Participate in research activities based on archival materials.

Tasks

  • Create and maintain accessible, retrievable computer archives and databases, incorporating current advances in electric information storage technology.
  • Organize archival records and develop classification systems to facilitate access to archival materials.
  • Authenticate and appraise historical documents and archival materials.
  • Provide reference services and assistance for users needing archival materials.
  • Direct activities of workers who assist in arranging, cataloguing, exhibiting and maintaining collections of valuable materials.
  • Prepare archival records, such as document descriptions, to allow easy access to information.
  • Preserve records, documents, and objects, copying records to film, videotape, audiotape, disk, or computer formats as necessary.
  • Establish and administer policy guidelines concerning public access and use of materials.
  • Locate new materials and direct their acquisition and display.
  • Research and record the origins and historical significance of archival materials.
  • Specialize in an area of history or technology, researching topics or items relevant to collections to determine what should be retained or acquired.
  • Coordinate educational and public outreach programs, such as tours, workshops, lectures, and classes.
  • Select and edit documents for publication and display, applying knowledge of subject, literary expression, and presentation techniques.

Interests

  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).
  • Training - Employees may need some on-the-job training, but most of these occupations assume that the person will already have the required skills, knowledge, work-related experience, and/or training.
  • Experience - Extensive skill, knowledge, and experience are needed for these occupations. Many require more than five years of experience. For example, surgeons must complete four years of college and an additional five to seven years of specialized medical training to be able to do their job.

Knowledge

Skills

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Related Careers

  • Archeologists
  • Curators
  • Historians
  • Kindergarten Teachers, Except Special Education
  • Museum Technicians and Conservators
  • Park Naturalists
  • Urban and Regional Planners
Wages for this career
America's Career InfoNet