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Details for Broadcast Technicians


Set up, operate, and maintain the electronic equipment used to transmit radio and television programs. Control audio equipment to regulate volume level and quality of sound during radio and television broadcasts. Operate radio transmitter to broadcast radio and television programs.


  • Maintain programming logs, as required by station management and the Federal Communications Commission.
  • Control audio equipment to regulate the volume and sound quality during radio and television broadcasts.
  • Monitor strength, clarity, and reliability of incoming and outgoing signals, and adjust equipment as necessary to maintain quality broadcasts.
  • Regulate the fidelity, brightness, and contrast of video transmissions, using video console control panels.
  • Observe monitors and converse with station personnel to determine audio and video levels and to ascertain that programs are airing.
  • Preview scheduled programs to ensure that signals are functioning and programs are ready for transmission.
  • Select sources from which programming will be received, or through which programming will be transmitted.
  • Report equipment problems, ensure that repairs are made, and make emergency repairs to equipment when necessary and possible.
  • Record sound onto tape or film for radio or television, checking its quality and making adjustments where necessary.
  • Align antennae with receiving dishes to obtain the clearest signal for transmission of broadcasts from field locations.
  • Substitute programs in cases where signals fail.
  • Organize recording sessions, and prepare areas such as radio booths and television stations for recording.
  • Perform preventive and minor equipment maintenance, using hand tools.
  • Instruct trainees in how to use television production equipment, how to film events, and how to copy and edit graphics or sound onto videotape.
  • Schedule programming, or read television programming logs to determine which programs are to be recorded or aired.
  • Edit broadcast material electronically, using computers.
  • Give technical directions to other personnel during filming.
  • Set up and operate portable field transmission equipment outside the studio.
  • Determine the number, type, and approximate location of microphones needed for best sound recording or transmission quality, and position them appropriately.
  • Design and modify equipment to employer specifications.
  • Prepare reports outlining past and future programs, including content.
  • Discuss production requirements with clients.
  • Produce educational and training films and videotapes by performing activities such as selecting equipment and preparing scripts.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.


  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Communications and Media - Knowledge of media production, communication, and dissemination techniques and methods. This includes alternative ways to inform and entertain via written, oral, and visual media.
  • Telecommunications - Knowledge of transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.


  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.

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