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Details for Cooks, Institution and Cafeteria


Prepare and cook large quantities of food for institutions, such as schools, hospitals, or cafeterias.


  • Clean and inspect galley equipment, kitchen appliances, and work areas in order to ensure cleanliness and functional operation.
  • Apportion and serve food to facility residents, employees, or patrons.
  • Cook foodstuffs according to menus, special dietary or nutritional restrictions, and numbers of portions to be served.
  • Clean, cut, and cook meat, fish, and poultry.
  • Monitor use of government food commodities to ensure that proper procedures are followed.
  • Wash pots, pans, dishes, utensils, and other cooking equipment.
  • Compile and maintain records of food use and expenditures.
  • Direct activities of one or more workers who assist in preparing and serving meals.
  • Bake breads, rolls, and other pastries.
  • Train new employees.
  • Take inventory of supplies and equipment.
  • Monitor menus and spending in order to ensure that meals are prepared economically.
  • Plan menus that are varied, nutritionally balanced, and appetizing, taking advantage of foods in season and local availability.
  • Requisition food supplies, kitchen equipment, and appliances, based on estimates of future needs.
  • Determine meal prices based on calculations of ingredient prices.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Social - Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.


  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.


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Wages for this career
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