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Details for Personal and Home Care Aides


Assist elderly or disabled adults with daily living activities at the person's home or in a daytime non-residential facility. Duties performed at a place of residence may include keeping house (making beds, doing laundry, washing dishes) and preparing meals. May provide meals and supervised activities at non-residential care facilities. May advise families, the elderly, and disabled on such things as nutrition, cleanliness, and household utilities.


  • Perform health care related tasks, such as monitoring vital signs and medication, under the direction of registered nurses and physiotherapists.
  • Administer bedside and personal care, such as ambulation and personal hygiene assistance.
  • Prepare and maintain records of client progress and services performed, reporting changes in client condition to manager or supervisor.
  • Perform housekeeping duties, such as cooking, cleaning, washing clothes and dishes, and running errands.
  • Care for individuals and families during periods of incapacitation, family disruption or convalescence, providing companionship, personal care and help in adjusting to new lifestyles.
  • Instruct and advise clients on issues such as household cleanliness, utilities, hygiene, nutrition and infant care.
  • Plan, shop for, and prepare nutritious meals, or assist families in planning, shopping for, and preparing nutritious meals.
  • Participate in case reviews, consulting with the team caring for the client, to evaluate the client's needs and plan for continuing services.
  • Transport clients to locations outside the home, such as to physicians' offices or on outings, using a motor vehicle.
  • Train family members to provide bedside care.
  • Provide clients with communication assistance, typing their correspondence and obtaining information for them.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Social - Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.


  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.


  • Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.

Related Careers

  • Child Care Workers
  • Counter and Rental Clerks
  • Dietetic Technicians
  • Home Health Aides
  • Locker Room, Coatroom, and Dressing Room Attendants
  • Opticians, Dispensing
  • Residential Advisors
  • Transportation Attendants, Except Flight Attendants and Baggage Porters
Wages for this career
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