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Details for Court Clerks


Description

Perform clerical duties in court of law; prepare docket of cases to be called; secure information for judges; and contact witnesses, attorneys, and litigants to obtain information for court.

Tasks

  • Prepare dockets or calendars of cases to be called, using typewriters or computers.
  • Record case dispositions, court orders, and arrangements made for payment of court fees.
  • Answer inquiries from the general public regarding judicial procedures, court appearances, trial dates, adjournments, outstanding warrants, summonses, subpoenas, witness fees, and payment of fines.
  • Prepare and issue orders of the court, including probation orders, release documentation, sentencing information, and summonses.
  • Prepare documents recording the outcomes of court proceedings.
  • Instruct parties about timing of court appearances.
  • Explain procedures or forms to parties in cases or to the general public.
  • Search files, and contact witnesses, attorneys, and litigants, in order to obtain information for the court.
  • Follow procedures to secure courtrooms and exhibits such as money, drugs, and weapons.
  • Amend indictments when necessary, and endorse indictments with pertinent information.
  • Read charges and related information to the court and, if necessary, record defendants' pleas.
  • Swear in jury members, interpreters, witnesses and defendants.
  • Collect court fees or fines, and record amounts collected.
  • Direct support staff in handling of paperwork processed by clerks' offices.
  • Prepare and mark all applicable court exhibits and evidence.
  • Examine legal documents submitted to courts for adherence to laws or court procedures.
  • Record court proceedings, using recording equipment, or record minutes of court proceedings using stenotype machines or shorthand.
  • Prepare courtrooms with paper, pens, water, easels, and electronic equipment, and ensure that recording equipment is working.
  • Conduct roll calls, and poll jurors.
  • Open courts, calling them to order and announcing judges.
  • Meet with judges, lawyers, parole officers, police, and social agency officials in order to coordinate the functions of the court.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.

Knowledge

  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.

Skills

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

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