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Details for File Clerks


File correspondence, cards, invoices, receipts, and other records in alphabetical or numerical order or according to the filing system used. Locate and remove material from file when requested.


  • Keep records of materials filed or removed, using logbooks or computers.
  • Add new material to file records, and create new records as necessary.
  • Perform general office duties such as typing, operating office machines, and sorting mail.
  • Track materials removed from files in order to ensure that borrowed files are returned.
  • Gather materials to be filed from departments and employees.
  • Sort or classify information according to guidelines such as content, purpose, user criteria, or chronological, alphabetical, or numerical order.
  • Find and retrieve information from files in response to requests from authorized users.
  • Scan or read incoming materials in order to determine how and where they should be classified or filed.
  • Place materials into storage receptacles, such as file cabinets, boxes, bins, or drawers, according to classification and identification information.
  • Assign and record or stamp identification numbers or codes in order to index materials for filing.
  • Answer questions about records and files.
  • Modify and improve filing systems, or implement new filing systems.
  • Perform periodic inspections of materials or files in order to ensure correct placement, legibility, and proper condition.
  • Eliminate outdated or unnecessary materials, destroying them or transferring them to inactive storage according to file maintenance guidelines and/or legal requirements.
  • Enter document identification codes into systems in order to determine locations of documents to be retrieved.
  • Operate mechanized files that rotate to bring needed records to a particular location.
  • Design forms related to filing systems.
  • Retrieve documents stored in microfilm or microfiche and place them in viewers for reading.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.


  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.


Related Careers

  • Data Entry Keyers
  • Mail Clerks and Mail Machine Operators, Except Postal Service
  • Marking Clerks
  • Medical Secretaries
  • Order Fillers, Wholesale and Retail Sales
Wages for this career
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