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Details for Postal Service Clerks


Perform any combination of tasks in a post office, such as receive letters and parcels; sell postage and revenue stamps, postal cards, and stamped envelopes; fill out and sell money orders; place mail in pigeon holes of mail rack or in bags according to State, address, or other scheme; and examine mail for correct postage.


  • Weigh letters and parcels; compute mailing costs based on type, weight, and destination; and affix correct postage.
  • Cash money orders.
  • Post announcements or government information on public bulletin boards.
  • Provide assistance to the public in complying with federal regulations of Postal Service and other federal agencies.
  • Answer questions regarding mail regulations and procedures, postage rates, and post office boxes.
  • Check mail in order to ensure correct postage and that packages and letters are in proper condition for mailing.
  • Complete forms regarding changes of address, or theft or loss of mail, or for special services such as registered or priority mail.
  • Feed mail into postage canceling devices or hand stamp mail to cancel postage.
  • Keep money drawers in order, and record and balance daily transactions.
  • Obtain signatures from recipients of registered or special delivery mail.
  • Provide customers with assistance in filing claims for mail theft, or lost or damaged mail.
  • Put undelivered parcels away, retrieve them when customers come to claim them, and complete any related documentation.
  • Receive letters and parcels, and place mail into bags.
  • Register, certify, and insure letters and parcels.
  • Rent post office boxes to customers.
  • Respond to complaints regarding mail theft, delivery problems, and lost or damaged mail, filling out forms and making appropriate referrals for investigation.
  • Sell and collect payment for products such as stamps, prepaid mail envelopes, and money orders.
  • Set postage meters, and calibrate them to ensure correct operation.
  • Sort incoming and outgoing mail, according to type and destination, by hand or by operating electronic mail-sorting and scanning devices.
  • Transport mail from one work station to another.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.


  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.


Related Careers

  • Counter and Rental Clerks
  • Insurance Claims Clerks
  • Library Assistants, Clerical
  • Library Technicians
  • Mail Clerks and Mail Machine Operators, Except Postal Service
  • Office Clerks, General
  • Statement Clerks
  • Weighers, Measurers, Checkers, and Samplers, Recordkeeping
Wages for this career
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