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Details for Shipping, Receiving, and Traffic Clerks


Verify and keep records on incoming and outgoing shipments. Prepare items for shipment. Duties include assembling, addressing, stamping, and shipping merchandise or material; receiving, unpacking, verifying and recording incoming merchandise or material; and arranging for the transportation of products.


  • Examine contents and compare with records, such as manifests, invoices, or orders, to verify accuracy of incoming or outgoing shipment.
  • Prepare documents, such as work orders, bills of lading, and shipping orders to route materials.
  • Determine shipping method for materials, using knowledge of shipping procedures, routes, and rates.
  • Record shipment data, such as weight, charges, space availability, and damages and discrepancies, for reporting, accounting, and recordkeeping purposes.
  • Contact carrier representative to make arrangements and to issue instructions for shipping and delivery of materials.
  • Confer and correspond with establishment representatives to rectify problems, such as damages, shortages, and nonconformance to specifications.
  • Requisition and store shipping materials and supplies to maintain inventory of stock.
  • Deliver or route materials to departments, using work devices, such as handtruck, conveyor, or sorting bins.
  • Compute amounts, such as space available, and shipping, storage, and demurrage charges, using calculator or price list.
  • Pack, seal, label, and affix postage to prepare materials for shipping, using work devices such as hand tools, power tools, and postage meter.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.


  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.


Related Careers

  • Coin, Vending, and Amusement Machine Servicers and Repairers
  • Freight and Cargo Inspectors
  • Mail Clerks and Mail Machine Operators, Except Postal Service
  • Procurement Clerks
  • Production, Planning, and Expediting Clerks
  • Stock Clerks- Stockroom, Warehouse, or Storage Yard
  • Weighers, Measurers, Checkers, and Samplers, Recordkeeping
Wages for this career
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