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Details for Weighers, Measurers, Checkers, and Samplers, Recordkeeping


Weigh, measure, and check materials, supplies, and equipment for the purpose of keeping relevant records. Duties are primarily clerical by nature.


  • Inspect incoming loads of waste to identify contents and to screen for the presence of specific regulated or hazardous wastes.
  • Unload or unpack incoming shipments.
  • Collect or prepare measurement, weight, or identification labels; and attach them to products.
  • Collect product samples and prepare them for laboratory analysis or testing.
  • Compare product labels, tags, or tickets, shipping manifests, purchase orders, and bills of lading to verify accuracy of shipment contents, quality specifications, and/or weights.
  • Count or estimate quantities of materials, parts, or products received or shipped.
  • Document quantity, quality, type, weight, test result data, and value of materials or products, in order to maintain shipping, receiving, and production records and files.
  • Examine products or materials, parts, subassemblies, and packaging for damage, defects, or shortages, using specification sheets, gauges, and standards charts.
  • Inspect products and examination records to determine the number of defects per worker and the reasons for examiners' rejections.
  • Maintain financial records, such as accounts of daily collections and billings, and records of receipts issued.
  • Operate scalehouse computers to obtain weight information about incoming shipments such as those from waste haulers.
  • Remove from stock products or loads not meeting quality standards, and notify supervisors or appropriate departments of discrepancies or shortages.
  • Weigh or measure materials, equipment, or products to maintain relevant records, using volume meters, scales, rules, and/or calipers.
  • Communicate with customers and vendors to exchange information regarding products, materials, and services.
  • Compute product totals and charges for shipments.
  • Examine or prepare plans, layouts, or drawings of facilities or finished products to identify storage locations or to verify parts assemblies.
  • Maintain, monitor, and clean work areas, such as recycling collection sites, drop boxes, counters and windows, and areas around scale houses.
  • Prepare measurement tables and conversion charts, using standard formulas.
  • Signal or instruct other workers to weigh, move, or check products.
  • Sort products or materials into predetermined sequences or groupings for display, packing, shipping, or storage.
  • Store samples of finished products in labeled cartons and record their location.
  • Transport materials, products, or samples to processing, shipping, or storage areas, manually or using conveyors, pumps, or hand trucks.
  • Fill orders for products and samples, following order tickets, and forward or mail items.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.


  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.


Related Careers

  • Mail Clerks and Mail Machine Operators, Except Postal Service
  • Marking Clerks
  • Office Clerks, General
  • Procurement Clerks
  • Shipping, Receiving, and Traffic Clerks
  • Stock Clerks- Stockroom, Warehouse, or Storage Yard
Wages for this career
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