CareerShip Home
About CareerShip
Resources
Contact Us
Mapping Your Future
  back
Visit the Featured Career Match My Career Interests
Review Careers by Clusters Career Search

Details for Brickmasons and Blockmasons


Description

Lay and bind building materials, such as brick, structural tile, concrete block, cinder block, glass block, and terra-cotta block, with mortar and other substances to construct or repair walls, partitions, arches, sewers, and other structures.

Tasks

  • Construct corners by fastening in plumb position a corner pole or building a corner pyramid of bricks, and filling in between the corners using a line from corner to corner to guide each course, or layer, of brick.
  • Measure distance from reference points and mark guidelines to lay out work, using plumb bobs and levels.
  • Calculate angles and courses and determine vertical and horizontal alignment of courses.
  • Fasten or fuse brick or other building material to structure with wire clamps, anchor holes, torch, or cement.
  • Break or cut bricks, tiles, or blocks to size, using trowel edge, hammer, or power saw.
  • Remove excess mortar with trowels and hand tools, and finish mortar joints with jointing tools, for a sealed, uniform appearance.
  • Interpret blueprints and drawings to determine specifications and to calculate the materials required.
  • Apply and smooth mortar or other mixture over work surface.
  • Mix specified amounts of sand, clay, dirt, or mortar powder with water to form refractory mixtures.
  • Examine brickwork or structure to determine need for repair.
  • Clean working surface to remove scale, dust, soot, or chips of brick and mortar, using broom, wire brush, or scraper.
  • Lay and align bricks, blocks, or tiles to build or repair structures or high temperature equipment, such as cupola, kilns, ovens, or furnaces.
  • Remove burned or damaged brick or mortar, using sledgehammer, crowbar, chipping gun, or chisel.
  • Spray or spread refractory material over brickwork to protect against deterioration.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.

Knowledge

  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.

Skills

  • Mathematics - Using mathematics to solve problems.

Related Careers

  • Construction Carpenters
  • Drywall and Ceiling Tile Installers
  • Fence Erectors
  • Helpers--Brickmasons, Blockmasons, Stonemasons, and Tile and Marble Setters
  • Reinforcing Iron and Rebar Workers
  • Rough Carpenters
  • Stonemasons
  • Tile and Marble Setters
Wages for this career
America's Career InfoNet