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Details for Motorboat Mechanics


Description

Repairs and adjusts electrical and mechanical equipment of gasoline or diesel powered inboard or inboard-outboard boat engines.

Tasks

  • Adjust carburetor mixtures, electrical point settings, and timing while motors are running in water-filled test tanks.
  • Adjust generators and replace faulty wiring, using hand tools and soldering irons.
  • Disassemble and inspect motors to locate defective parts, using mechanic's hand tools and gauges.
  • Idle motors and observe thermometers to determine the effectiveness of cooling systems.
  • Inspect and repair or adjust propellers and propeller shafts.
  • Repair engine mechanical equipment such as power-tilts, bilge pumps, or power take-offs.
  • Repair or rework parts, using machine tools such as lathes, mills, drills, and grinders.
  • Replace parts such as gears, magneto points, piston rings, and spark plugs, and reassemble engines.
  • Set starter locks, and align and repair steering or throttle controls, using gauges, screwdrivers, and wrenches.
  • Start motors, and monitor performance for signs of malfunctioning such as smoke, excessive vibration, and misfiring.
  • Document inspection and test results, and work performed or to be performed.
  • Mount motors to boats and operate boats at various speeds on waterways to conduct operational tests.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.

Knowledge

  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Skills

  • Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

Related Careers

  • Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers
  • Heating and Air Conditioning Mechanics and Installers
  • Home Appliance Repairers
  • Locksmiths and Safe Repairers
  • Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics, Except Engines
  • Motorcycle Mechanics
  • Outdoor Power Equipment and Other Small Engine Mechanics
  • Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers
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