CareerShip Home
About CareerShip
Resources
Contact Us
Mapping Your Future
  back
Visit the Featured Career Match My Career Interests
Review Careers by Clusters Career Search

Details for Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers


Description

Install and repair industrial and commercial refrigerating systems.

Tasks

  • Braze or solder parts to repair defective joints and leaks.
  • Observe and test system operation, using gauges and instruments.
  • Test lines, components, and connections for leaks.
  • Dismantle malfunctioning systems and test components, using electrical, mechanical, and pneumatic testing equipment.
  • Adjust or replace worn or defective mechanisms and parts, and reassemble repaired systems.
  • Read blueprints to determine location, size, capacity, and type of components needed to build refrigeration system.
  • Supervise and instruct assistants.
  • Install wiring to connect components to an electric power source.
  • Perform mechanical overhauls and refrigerant reclaiming.
  • Cut, bend, thread, and connect pipe to functional components and water, power, or refrigeration system.
  • Adjust valves according to specifications and charge system with proper type of refrigerant by pumping the specified gas or fluid into the system.
  • Estimate, order, pick up, deliver, and install materials and supplies needed to maintain equipment in good working condition.
  • Install expansion and control valves, using acetylene torches and wrenches.
  • Mount compressor, condenser, and other components in specified locations on frames, using hand tools and acetylene welding equipment.
  • Keep records of repairs and replacements made and causes of malfunctions.
  • Lay out reference points for installation of structural and functional components, using measuring instruments.
  • Schedule work with customers and initiate work orders, house requisitions and orders from stock.
  • Fabricate and assemble structural and functional components of refrigeration system, using hand tools, power tools, and welding equipment.
  • Lift and align components into position, using hoist or block and tackle.
  • Drill holes and install mounting brackets and hangers into floor and walls of building.
  • Insulate shells and cabinets of systems.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.

Knowledge

  • Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
  • Sales and Marketing - Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • Chemistry - Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Skills

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Installation - Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
  • Quality Control Analysis - Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.

Related Careers

  • Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers
  • Heating and Air Conditioning Mechanics and Installers
  • Home Appliance Repairers
  • Locksmiths and Safe Repairers
  • Motorboat Mechanics
  • Motorcycle Mechanics
  • Outdoor Power Equipment and Other Small Engine Mechanics
Wages for this career
America's Career InfoNet