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Details for Maintenance Workers, Machinery


Lubricate machinery, change parts, or perform other routine machinery maintenance.


  • Measure, mix, prepare, and test chemical solutions used to clean or repair machinery and equipment.
  • Transport machine parts, tools, equipment, and other material between work areas and storage, using cranes, hoists, or dollies.
  • Read work orders and specifications to determine machines and equipment requiring repair or maintenance.
  • Record production, repair, and machine maintenance information.
  • Replace, empty, or replenish machine and equipment containers such as gas tanks or boxes.
  • Set up and operate machines, and adjust controls to regulate operations.
  • Clean machines and machine parts, using cleaning solvents, cloths, air guns, hoses, vacuums, or other equipment.
  • Dismantle machines and remove parts for repair, using hand tools, chain falls, jacks, cranes, or hoists.
  • Inspect or test damaged machine parts, and mark defective areas or advise supervisors of repair needs.
  • Install, replace, or change machine parts and attachments, according to production specifications.
  • Lubricate or apply adhesives or other materials to machines, machine parts, or other equipment, according to specified procedures.
  • Reassemble machines after the completion of repair or maintenance work.
  • Remove hardened material from machines or machine parts, using abrasives, power and hand tools, jackhammers, sledgehammers, or other equipment.
  • Replace or repair metal, wood, leather, glass, or other lining in machines, or in equipment compartments or containers.
  • Start machines and observe mechanical operation to determine efficiency and to detect problems.
  • Collaborate with other workers to repair or move machines, machine parts, or equipment.
  • Collect and discard worn machine parts and other refuse in order to maintain machinery and work areas.
  • Inventory and requisition machine parts, equipment, and other supplies so that stock can be maintained and replenished.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.


  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.


  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

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