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Details for Refractory Materials Repairers, Except Brickmasons


Build or repair furnaces, kilns, cupolas, boilers, converters, ladles, soaking pits, ovens, etc., using refractory materials.


  • Transfer clay structures to curing ovens, melting tanks, and drawing kilns, using forklifts.
  • Bolt sections of wooden molds together, using wrenches, and line molds with paper to prevent clay from sticking to molds.
  • Chip slag from linings of ladles or remove linings when beyond repair, using hammers and chisels.
  • Disassemble molds, and cut, chip, and smooth clay structures such as floaters, drawbars, and L-blocks.
  • Drill holes in furnace walls, bolt overlapping layers of plastic to walls, and hammer surfaces to compress layers into solid sheets.
  • Dry and bake new linings by placing inverted linings over burners, building fires in ladles, or by using blowtorches.
  • Dump and tamp clay in molds, using tamping tools.
  • Fasten stopper heads to rods with metal pins to assemble refractory stoppers used to plug pouring nozzles of steel ladles.
  • Install clay structures in melting tanks and drawing kilns to control the flow and temperature of molten glass, using hoists and hand tools.
  • Measure furnace walls to determine dimensions, then cut required number of sheets from plastic block, using saws.
  • Mix specified amounts of sand, clay, mortar powder, and water to form refractory clay or mortar, using shovels or mixing machines.
  • Reline or repair ladles and pouring spouts with refractory clay, using trowels.
  • Remove worn or damaged plastic block refractory linings of furnaces, using hand tools.
  • Spread mortar on stopper heads and rods, using trowels, and slide brick sleeves over rods to form refractory jackets.
  • Tighten locknuts holding refractory stopper assemblies together, spread mortar on jackets to seal sleeve joints, and dry mortar in ovens.
  • Climb scaffolding, carrying hoses, and spray surfaces of cupolas with refractory mixtures, using spray equipment.
  • Install preformed metal scaffolding in interiors of cupolas, using hand tools.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.


  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.


Related Careers

  • Cutting, Punching, and Press Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
  • Helpers--Brickmasons, Blockmasons, Stonemasons, and Tile and Marble Setters
  • Helpers--Pipelayers, Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters
  • Hoist and Winch Operators
  • Molding, Coremaking, and Casting Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
  • Patternmakers, Metal and Plastic
  • Welders, Cutters, and Welder Fitters
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