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Details for Medical Equipment Repairers


Description

Test, adjust, or repair biomedical or electromedical equipment.

Tasks

  • Inspect and test malfunctioning medical and related equipment following manufacturers' specifications, using test and analysis instruments.
  • Examine medical equipment and facility's structural environment and check for proper use of equipment, to protect patients and staff from electrical or mechanical hazards and to ensure compliance with safety regulations.
  • Disassemble malfunctioning equipment and remove, repair and replace defective parts such as motors, clutches or transformers.
  • Keep records of maintenance, repair, and required updates of equipment.
  • Perform preventive maintenance or service such as cleaning, lubricating and adjusting equipment.
  • Test and calibrate components and equipment following manufacturers' manuals and troubleshooting techniques, using hand tools, power tools and measuring devices.
  • Explain and demonstrate correct operation and preventive maintenance of medical equipment to personnel.
  • Study technical manuals and attend training sessions provided by equipment manufacturers to maintain current knowledge.
  • Plan and carry out work assignments, using blueprints, schematic drawings, technical manuals, wiring diagrams, and liquid and air flow sheets, following prescribed regulations, directives, and other instructions as required.
  • Solder loose connections, using soldering iron.
  • Test, evaluate, and classify excess or in-use medical equipment and determine serviceability, condition, and disposition in accordance with regulations.
  • Research catalogs and repair part lists to locate sources for repair parts, requisitioning parts and recording their receipt.
  • Evaluate technical specifications to identify equipment and systems best suited for intended use and possible purchase based on specifications, user needs and technical requirements.
  • Contribute expertise to develop medical maintenance standard operating procedures.
  • Compute power and space requirements for installing medical, dental or related equipment and install units to manufacturers' specifications.
  • Supervise and advise subordinate personnel.
  • Repair shop equipment, metal furniture, and hospital equipment, including welding broken parts and replacing missing parts, or bring item into local shop for major repairs.
  • Make computations relating to load requirements of wiring and equipment, using algebraic expressions and standard formulas.
  • Fabricate, dress down, or substitute parts or major new items to modify equipment to meet unique operational or research needs, working from job orders, sketches, modification orders, samples or discussions with operating officials.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.

Knowledge

  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Skills

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
  • Quality Control Analysis - Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.

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  • Motorcycle Mechanics
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