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Details for Riggers


Description

Set up or repair rigging for construction projects, manufacturing plants, logging yards, ships and shipyards, or for the entertainment industry.

Tasks

  • Attach loads to rigging to provide support or prepare them for moving, using hand and power tools.
  • Manipulate rigging lines, hoists, and pulling gear to move or support materials such as heavy equipment, ships, or theatrical sets.
  • Signal or verbally direct workers engaged in hoisting and moving loads, in order to ensure safety of workers and materials.
  • Clean and dress machine surfaces and component parts.
  • Align, level, and anchor machinery.
  • Attach pulleys and blocks to fixed overhead structures such as beams, ceilings, and gin pole booms, using bolts and clamps.
  • Control movement of heavy equipment through narrow openings or confined spaces, using chainfalls, gin poles, gallows frames, and other equipment.
  • Dismantle and store rigging equipment after use.
  • Fabricate, set up, and repair rigging, supporting structures, hoists, and pulling gear, using hand and power tools.
  • Select gear such as cables, pulleys, and winches, according to load weights and sizes, facilities, and work schedules.
  • Test rigging to ensure safety and reliability.
  • Tilt, dip, and turn suspended loads to maneuver over, under, and/or around obstacles, using multi-point suspension techniques.
  • Install ground rigging for yarding lines, attaching chokers to logs and then to the lines.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.

Knowledge

  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Skills

Related Careers

  • Aircraft Structure, Surfaces, Rigging, and Systems Assemblers
  • Crane and Tower Operators
  • Engine and Other Machine Assemblers
  • Helpers--Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Workers
  • Hoist and Winch Operators
  • Welders, Cutters, and Welder Fitters
Wages for this career
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