Career summary

Details for Geophysical Data Technicians


Description

Measure, record, and evaluate geological data, using sonic, electronic, electrical, seismic, or gravity-measuring instruments to prospect for oil or gas. May collect and evaluate core samples and cuttings.

Tasks

  • Prepare notes, sketches, geological maps, or cross-sections.
  • Read and study reports in order to compile information and data for geological and geophysical prospecting.
  • Interview individuals, and research public databases in order to obtain information.
  • Assemble, maintain, or distribute information for library or record systems.
  • Operate or adjust equipment or apparatus used to obtain geological data.
  • Plan and direct activities of workers who operate equipment to collect data.
  • Set up or direct set-up of instruments used to collect geological data.
  • Record readings in order to compile data used in prospecting for oil or gas.
  • Supervise oil, water, or gas well-drilling activities.
  • Collect samples or cuttings, using equipment or hand tools.
  • Create photographic recordings of information, using equipment.
  • Measure geological characteristics used in prospecting for oil or gas, using measuring instruments.
  • Evaluate and interpret core samples and cuttings, and other geological data used in prospecting for oil or gas.
  • Diagnose or repair malfunctioning instruments or equipment, using manufacturers' manuals and hand tools.
  • Prepare and attach packing instructions to shipping containers.
  • Develop and design packing materials and handling procedures for shipping of objects.
  • Apply new technologies, such as improved seismic imaging techniques, to locate untapped oil or natural gas deposits.
  • Collect data on underground areas, such as reservoirs, that could be used in carbon sequestration operations.
  • Collect geological data from potential geothermal energy plant sites.
  • Compile data used to address environmental issues, such as the suitability of potential landfill sites.
  • Conduct geophysical surveys of potential sites for wind farms or solar installations to determine their suitability.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.
  • Experience - A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an accountant must complete four years of college and work for several years in accounting to be considered qualified.

Knowledge

  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Geography - Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.

Skills

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Science - Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.

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