Career summary

Details for Audio and Video Equipment Technicians


Description

Set up or set up and operate audio and video equipment including microphones, sound speakers, video screens, projectors, video monitors, recording equipment, connecting wires and cables, sound and mixing boards, and related electronic equipment for concerts, sports events, meetings and conventions, presentations, and news conferences. May also set up and operate associated spotlights and other custom lighting systems.

Tasks

  • Notify supervisors when major equipment repairs are needed.
  • Diagnose and resolve media system problems.
  • Direct and coordinate activities of assistants and other personnel during production.
  • Compress, digitize, duplicate, and store audio and video data.
  • Install, adjust, and operate electronic equipment to record, edit, and transmit radio and television programs, motion pictures, video conferencing, or multimedia presentations.
  • Control the lights and sound of events, such as live concerts, before and after performances, and during intermissions.
  • Switch sources of video input from one camera or studio to another, from film to live programming, or from network to local programming.
  • Record and edit audio material, such as movie soundtracks, using audio recording and editing equipment.
  • Perform minor repairs and routine cleaning of audio and video equipment.
  • Design layouts of audio and video equipment and perform upgrades and maintenance.
  • Conduct training sessions on selection, use, and design of audio-visual materials and on operation of presentation equipment.
  • Monitor incoming and outgoing pictures and sound feeds to ensure quality and notify directors of any possible problems.
  • Mix and regulate sound inputs and feeds or coordinate audio feeds with television pictures.
  • Construct and position properties, sets, lighting equipment, and other equipment.
  • Reserve audio-visual equipment and facilities, such as meeting rooms.
  • Determine formats, approaches, content, levels, and mediums to effectively meet objectives within budgetary constraints, using research, knowledge, and training.
  • Edit videotapes by erasing and removing portions of programs and adding video or sound as required.
  • Obtain, set up, and load videotapes for scheduled productions or broadcasts.
  • Produce rough and finished graphics and graphic designs.
  • Locate and secure settings, properties, effects, and other production necessities.
  • Meet with directors and senior members of camera crews to discuss assignments and determine filming sequences, camera movements, and picture composition.
  • Maintain inventories of audio and videotapes and related supplies.
  • Obtain and preview musical performance programs prior to events to become familiar with the order and approximate times of pieces.
  • Perform narration of productions or present announcements.
  • Plan and develop pre-production ideas into outlines, scripts, story boards, and graphics, using own ideas or specifications of assignments.
  • Organize and maintain compliance, license, and warranty information related to audio and video facilities.
  • Inform users of audio and videotaping service policies and procedures.
  • Analyze and maintain data logs for audio-visual activities.
  • Develop manuals, texts, workbooks, or related materials for use in conjunction with production materials or for training.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.

Knowledge

  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Telecommunications - Knowledge of transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Communications and Media - Knowledge of media production, communication, and dissemination techniques and methods. This includes alternative ways to inform and entertain via written, oral, and visual media.

Skills

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Related careers

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  • Broadcast Technicians
  • Film and Video Editors
  • Floral Designers
  • Program Directors
  • Set and Exhibit Designers
  • Technical Directors/Managers
  • Technical Writers
  • Training and Development Managers