Career summary

Details for Transit and Railroad Police


Description

Protect and police railroad and transit property, employees, or passengers.

Tasks

  • Prepare reports documenting investigation activities and results.
  • Monitor transit areas and conduct security checks to protect railroad properties, patrons, and employees.
  • Apprehend or remove trespassers or thieves from railroad property or coordinate with law enforcement agencies in apprehensions and removals.
  • Direct security activities at derailments, fires, floods, or strikes involving railroad property.
  • Patrol railroad yards, cars, stations, or other facilities to protect company property or shipments and to maintain order.
  • Investigate or direct investigations of freight theft, suspicious damage or loss of passengers' valuables, or other crimes on railroad property.
  • Examine credentials of unauthorized persons attempting to enter secured areas.
  • Enforce traffic laws regarding the transit system and reprimand individuals who violate them.
  • Provide training to the public or law enforcement personnel in railroad safety or security.
  • Plan or implement special safety or preventive programs, such as fire or accident prevention.
  • Direct or coordinate the daily activities or training of security staff.
  • Record and verify seal numbers from boxcars containing frequently pilfered items, such as cigarettes or liquor, to detect tampering.
  • Interview neighbors, associates, or former employers of job applicants to verify personal references or to obtain work history data.
  • Seal empty boxcars by twisting nails in door hasps, using nail twisters.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.

Knowledge

  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

Skills

  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

Related careers

  • Correctional Officers and Jailers
  • Criminal Investigators and Special Agents
  • Fire Inspectors
  • Fire Investigators
  • Police Detectives
  • Private Detectives and Investigators
  • Security Guards
  • Sheriffs and Deputy Sheriffs
  • Transportation Vehicle, Equipment and Systems Inspectors, Except Aviation