Career summary

Details for Security Guards


Description

Guard, patrol, or monitor premises to prevent theft, violence, or infractions of rules.

Tasks

  • Lock doors and gates of entrances and exits to secure buildings.
  • Answer alarms and investigate disturbances.
  • Monitor and authorize entrance and departure of employees, visitors, and other persons to guard against theft and maintain security of premises.
  • Write reports of daily activities and irregularities, such as equipment or property damage, theft, presence of unauthorized persons, or unusual occurrences.
  • Patrol industrial or commercial premises to prevent and detect signs of intrusion and ensure security of doors, windows, and gates.
  • Call police or fire departments in cases of emergency, such as fire or presence of unauthorized persons.
  • Respond to medical emergencies by administering basic first aid or by obtaining assistance from paramedics.
  • Circulate among visitors, patrons, or employees to preserve order and protect property.
  • Warn persons of rule infractions or violations, and apprehend or evict violators from premises, using force when necessary.
  • Answer telephone calls to take messages, answer questions, and provide information during non-business hours or when switchboard is closed.
  • Operate detecting devices to screen individuals and prevent passage of prohibited articles into restricted areas.
  • Inspect and adjust security systems, equipment, or machinery to ensure operational use and to detect evidence of tampering.
  • Escort or drive motor vehicle to transport individuals to specified locations or to provide personal protection.
  • Monitor and adjust controls that regulate building systems, such as air conditioning, furnace, or boiler.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.

Knowledge

  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Psychology - Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.

Skills

Related careers

  • Bailiffs
  • Bus Drivers, School
  • Correctional Officers and Jailers
  • Criminal Investigators and Special Agents
  • Fire Inspectors
  • Police Detectives
  • Private Detectives and Investigators
  • Sheriffs and Deputy Sheriffs
  • Truck Drivers, Light or Delivery Services