Career summary

Details for Bartenders


Description

Mix and serve drinks to patrons, directly or through waitstaff.

Tasks

  • Clean glasses, utensils, and bar equipment.
  • Collect money for drinks served.
  • Balance cash receipts.
  • Check identification of customers to verify age requirements for purchase of alcohol.
  • Clean bars, work areas, and tables.
  • Attempt to limit problems and liability related to customers' excessive drinking by taking steps such as persuading customers to stop drinking, or ordering taxis or other transportation for intoxicated patrons.
  • Take beverage orders from serving staff or directly from patrons.
  • Serve wine, and bottled or draft beer.
  • Plan, organize, and control the operations of a cocktail lounge or bar.
  • Stock bar with beer, wine, liquor, and related supplies such as ice, glassware, napkins, or straws.
  • Serve snacks or food items to customers seated at the bar.
  • Mix ingredients, such as liquor, soda, water, sugar, and bitters, to prepare cocktails and other drinks.
  • Slice and pit fruit for garnishing drinks.
  • Ask customers who become loud and obnoxious to leave, or physically remove them.
  • Arrange bottles and glasses to make attractive displays.
  • Create drink recipes.
  • Supervise the work of bar staff and other bartenders.
  • Order or requisition liquors and supplies.
  • Plan bar menus.
  • Prepare appetizers such as pickles, cheese, and cold meats.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Social - Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.

Knowledge

  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

Skills

Related careers

  • Cashiers
  • Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food
  • Counter and Rental Clerks
  • Flight Attendants
  • Food Preparation Workers
  • Locker Room, Coatroom, and Dressing Room Attendants
  • Transportation Attendants, Except Flight Attendants and Baggage Porters
  • Waiters and Waitresses