Career summary

Details for Food Servers, Nonrestaurant


Description

Serve food to patrons outside of a restaurant environment, such as in hotels, hospital rooms, or cars.

Tasks

  • Examine trays to ensure that they contain required items.
  • Place food servings on plates or trays according to orders or instructions.
  • Monitor food distribution, ensuring that meals are delivered to the correct recipients and that guidelines, such as those for special diets, are followed.
  • Load trays with accessories such as eating utensils, napkins, or condiments.
  • Clean or sterilize dishes, kitchen utensils, equipment, or facilities.
  • Monitor food preparation or serving techniques to ensure that proper procedures are followed.
  • Take food orders and relay orders to kitchens or serving counters so they can be filled.
  • Carry food, silverware, or linen on trays or use carts to carry trays.
  • Determine where patients or patrons would like to eat their meals and help them get situated.
  • Prepare food items, such as sandwiches, salads, soups, or beverages.
  • Remove trays and stack dishes for return to kitchen after meals are finished.
  • Stock service stations with items, such as ice, napkins, or straws.
  • Record amounts and types of special food items served to customers.
  • Total checks, present them to customers, and accept payment for services.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Social - Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - Some of these occupations may require a high school diploma or GED certificate.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few days to a few months of training. Usually, an experienced worker could show you how to do the job.
  • Experience - Little or no previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, a person can become a waiter or waitress even if he/she has never worked before.

Knowledge

Skills

Related careers

  • Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food
  • Cooks, Fast Food
  • Cooks, Short Order
  • Counter Attendants, Cafeteria, Food Concession, and Coffee Shop
  • Dining Room and Cafeteria Attendants and Bartender Helpers
  • Hotel, Motel, and Resort Desk Clerks
  • Parking Lot Attendants
  • Ushers, Lobby Attendants, and Ticket Takers