Career summary

Details for First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Animal Husbandry and Animal Care Workers


Description

Directly supervise and coordinate activities of animal husbandry or animal care workers.

Tasks

  • Assign tasks such as feeding and treatment of animals, and cleaning and maintenance of animal quarters.
  • Observe animals for signs of illness, injury, or unusual behavior, notifying veterinarians or managers as warranted.
  • Monitor animal care, maintenance, breeding, or packing and transfer activities to ensure work is done correctly.
  • Treat animal illnesses or injuries, following experience or instructions of veterinarians.
  • Establish work schedules and procedures.
  • Train workers in animal care procedures, maintenance duties, and safety precautions.
  • Perform the same animal care duties as subordinates.
  • Transport or arrange for transport of animals, equipment, food, animal feed, and other supplies to and from work sites.
  • Inspect buildings, fences, fields or ranges, supplies, and equipment to determine work to be performed.
  • Prepare reports concerning facility activities, employees' time records, and animal treatment.
  • Direct and assist workers in maintenance and repair of facilities.
  • Confer with managers to determine production requirements, conditions of equipment and supplies, and work schedules.
  • Investigate complaints of animal neglect or cruelty, and follow up on complaints appearing to require prosecution.
  • Recruit, hire, and pay workers.
  • Study feed, weight, health, genetic, or milk production records to determine feed formulas and rations and breeding schedules.
  • Inseminate livestock artificially to produce desired offspring.
  • Operate euthanasia equipment to destroy animals.
  • Plan budgets and arrange for purchase of animals, feed, or supplies.
  • Monitor eggs and adjust incubator thermometers and gauges to facilitate hatching progress and to maintain specified conditions.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.

Knowledge

  • Chemistry - Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.

Skills

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Management of Personnel Resources - Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job.

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