Career summary

Details for Office Machine Operators, Except Computer


Description

Operate one or more of a variety of office machines, such as photocopying, photographic, and duplicating machines, or other office machines.

Tasks

  • Read job orders to determine the type of work to be done, the quantities to be produced, and the materials needed.
  • Deliver completed work.
  • Place original copies in feed trays, feed originals into feed rolls, or position originals on tables beneath camera lenses.
  • Sort, assemble, and proof completed work.
  • Operate office machines such as high speed business photocopiers, readers, scanners, addressing machines, stencil-cutting machines, microfilm readers or printers, folding and inserting machines, bursters, and binder machines.
  • Complete records of production, including work volumes and outputs, materials used, and any backlogs.
  • Compute prices for services and receive payment, or provide supervisors with billing information.
  • Set up and adjust machines, regulating factors such as speed, ink flow, focus, and number of copies.
  • Load machines with materials such as blank paper or film.
  • Monitor machine operation, and make adjustments as necessary to ensure proper operation.
  • Clean machines, perform minor repairs, and report major repair needs.
  • File and store completed documents.
  • Operate auxiliary machines such as collators, pad and tablet making machines, staplers, and paper punching, folding, cutting, and perforating machines.
  • Maintain stock of supplies, and requisition any needed items.
  • Prepare and process papers for use in scanning, microfilming, and microfiche.
  • Clean and file master copies or plates.
  • Cut copies apart and write identifying information, such as page numbers or titles, on copies.
  • Move heat units and clamping frames over screen beds to form Braille impressions on pages, raising frames to release individual copies.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.

Knowledge

  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Skills

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