Career summary

Details for Statistical Assistants


Description

Compile and compute data according to statistical formulas for use in statistical studies. May perform actuarial computations and compile charts and graphs for use by actuaries. Includes actuarial clerks.

Tasks

  • Compute and analyze data, using statistical formulas and computers or calculators.
  • Check source data to verify completeness and accuracy.
  • Enter data into computers for use in analyses or reports.
  • Compile reports, charts, or graphs that describe and interpret findings of analyses.
  • Participate in the publication of data or information.
  • File data and related information and maintain and update databases.
  • Organize paperwork, such as survey forms or reports, for distribution or analysis.
  • Code data prior to computer entry, using lists of codes.
  • Compile statistics from source materials, such as production or sales records, quality-control or test records, time sheets, or survey sheets.
  • Interview people and keep track of their responses.
  • Check survey responses for errors, such as the use of pens instead of pencils, and set aside response forms that cannot be used.
  • Select statistical tests for analyzing data.
  • Discuss data presentation requirements with clients.
  • Send out surveys.

Interests

  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.
  • Experience - A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an accountant must complete four years of college and work for several years in accounting to be considered qualified.

Knowledge

  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

Skills

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Mathematics - Using mathematics to solve problems.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Programming - Writing computer programs for various purposes.

Related careers

  • Billing, Posting, and Calculating Machine Operators
  • Claims Examiners, Property and Casualty Insurance
  • Coin, Vending, and Amusement Machine Servicers and Repairers
  • Cost Estimators
  • Insurance Policy Processing Clerks
  • Insurance Underwriters
  • Mathematical Technicians
  • Mathematicians
  • Payroll and Timekeeping Clerks