Career summary

Details for Continuous Mining Machine Operators


Description

Operate self-propelled mining machines that rip coal, metal and nonmetal ores, rock, stone, or sand from the face and load it onto conveyors or into shuttle cars in a continuous operation.

Tasks

  • Hang ventilation tubing and ventilation curtains to ensure that the mining face area is kept properly ventilated.
  • Conduct methane gas checks to ensure breathing quality of air.
  • Check the stability of roof and rib support systems before mining face areas.
  • Operate mining machines to gather coal and convey it to floors or shuttle cars.
  • Drive machines into position at working faces.
  • Move controls to start and regulate movement of conveyors and to start and position drill cutters or torches.
  • Reposition machines to make additional holes or cuts.
  • Determine locations, boundaries, and depths of holes or channels to be cut.
  • Observe and listen to equipment operation to detect binding or stoppage of tools or other equipment malfunctions.
  • Repair, oil, and adjust machines, and change cutting teeth, using wrenches.
  • Install casings to prevent cave-ins.
  • Scrape or wash conveyors, using belt scrapers or belt washers, to minimize dust production.
  • Move levers to raise and lower hydraulic safety bars supporting roofs above machines until other workers complete framing.
  • Apply new technologies developed to minimize the environmental impact of coal mining.
  • Guide and assist crews laying track and resetting supports and blocking.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.

Knowledge

  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Skills

  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.

Related careers

  • Derrick Operators, Oil and Gas
  • Helpers--Extraction Workers
  • Loading Machine Operators, Underground Mining
  • Mine Cutting and Channeling Machine Operators
  • Operating Engineers and Other Construction Equipment Operators
  • Paving, Surfacing, and Tamping Equipment Operators
  • Rail-Track Laying and Maintenance Equipment Operators
  • Rotary Drill Operators, Oil and Gas
  • Shuttle Car Operators