Career summary

Details for Security and Fire Alarm Systems Installers


Description

Install, program, maintain, and repair security and fire alarm wiring and equipment. Ensure that work is in accordance with relevant codes.

Tasks

  • Install, maintain, or repair security systems, alarm devices, or related equipment, following blueprints of electrical layouts and building plans.
  • Mount and fasten control panels, door and window contacts, sensors, or video cameras and attach electrical and telephone wiring to connect components.
  • Demonstrate systems for customers and explain details, such as the causes and consequences of false alarms.
  • Test and repair circuits and sensors, following wiring and system specifications.
  • Feed cables through access holes, roof spaces, or cavity walls to reach fixture outlets, positioning and terminating cables, wires, or strapping.
  • Examine systems to locate problems, such as loose connections or broken insulation.
  • Test backup batteries, keypad programming, sirens, or other security features to ensure proper functioning or to diagnose malfunctions.
  • Drill holes for wiring in wall studs, joists, ceilings, or floors.
  • Inspect installation sites and study work orders, building plans, and installation manuals to determine materials requirements and installation procedures.
  • Consult with clients to assess risks and to determine security requirements.
  • Mount raceways and conduits and fasten wires to wood framing, using staplers.
  • Adjust sensitivity of units, based on room structures and manufacturers' recommendations, using programming keypads.
  • Keep informed of new products and developments.
  • Order replacement parts.
  • Prepare documents, such as invoices or warranties.
  • Provide customers with cost estimates for equipment installation.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.

Knowledge

  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Telecommunications - Knowledge of transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

Skills

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

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