Career summary

Details for Automotive Master Mechanics


Description

Repair automobiles, trucks, buses, and other vehicles. Master mechanics repair virtually any part on the vehicle or specialize in the transmission system.

Tasks

  • Test drive vehicles and test components and systems, using equipment such as infrared engine analyzers, compression gauges, and computerized diagnostic devices.
  • Test and adjust repaired systems to meet manufacturers' performance specifications.
  • Repair, reline, replace, and adjust brakes.
  • Review work orders and discuss work with supervisors.
  • Confer with customers to obtain descriptions of vehicle problems and to discuss work to be performed and future repair requirements.
  • Examine vehicles to determine extent of damage or malfunctions.
  • Align vehicles' front ends.
  • Tear down, repair, and rebuild faulty assemblies, such as power systems, steering systems, and linkages.
  • Perform routine and scheduled maintenance services, such as oil changes, lubrications, and tune-ups.
  • Plan work procedures, using charts, technical manuals, and experience.
  • Follow checklists to ensure all important parts are examined, including belts, hoses, steering systems, spark plugs, brake and fuel systems, wheel bearings, and other potentially troublesome areas.
  • Maintain cleanliness of work area.
  • Repair radiator leaks.
  • Repair and service air conditioning, heating, engine cooling, and electrical systems.
  • Disassemble units and inspect parts for wear, using micrometers, calipers, and gauges.
  • Overhaul or replace carburetors, blowers, generators, distributors, starters, and pumps.
  • Repair or replace parts such as pistons, rods, gears, valves, and bearings.
  • Rewire ignition systems, lights, and instrument panels.
  • Repair manual and automatic transmissions.
  • Repair or replace shock absorbers.
  • Replace and adjust headlights.
  • Install and repair accessories, such as radios, heaters, mirrors, and windshield wipers.
  • Rebuild parts, such as crankshafts and cylinder blocks.
  • Repair damaged automobile bodies.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.

Knowledge

  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Skills

  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
  • Quality Control Analysis - Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.

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