Career summary

Details for Motorcycle Mechanics


Description

Diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul motorcycles, scooters, mopeds, dirt bikes, or similar motorized vehicles.

Tasks

  • Mount, balance, change, or check condition or pressure of tires.
  • Listen to engines, examine vehicle frames, or confer with customers to determine nature and extent of malfunction or damage.
  • Replace defective parts, using hand tools, arbor presses, flexible power presses, or power tools.
  • Repair or adjust motorcycle subassemblies, such as forks, transmissions, brakes, or drive chains, according to specifications.
  • Repair or replace other parts, such as headlights, horns, handlebar controls, gasoline or oil tanks, starters, or mufflers.
  • Dismantle engines and repair or replace defective parts, such as magnetos, carburetors, or generators.
  • Connect test panels to engines and measure generator output, ignition timing, or other engine performance indicators.
  • Disassemble subassembly units and examine condition, movement, or alignment of parts, visually or using gauges.
  • Remove cylinder heads and grind valves to scrape off carbon and replace defective valves, pistons, cylinders, or rings, using hand and power tools.
  • Reassemble frames and reinstall engines after repairs.
  • Reassemble and test subassembly units.
  • Hammer out dents and bends in frames and weld tears and breaks.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.

Knowledge

  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Skills

  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

Related careers

  • Bicycle Repairers
  • Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine Specialists
  • Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers
  • Home Appliance Repairers
  • Locksmiths and Safe Repairers
  • Motorboat Mechanics
  • Outdoor Power Equipment and Other Small Engine Mechanics
  • Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers