Career summary

Details for Watch Repairers


Description

Repair, clean, and adjust mechanisms of timing instruments, such as watches and clocks.

Tasks

  • Clean, rinse, and dry timepiece parts, using solutions and ultrasonic or mechanical watch-cleaning machines.
  • Adjust timing regulators, using truing calipers, watch-rate recorders, and tweezers.
  • Reassemble timepieces, replacing glass faces and batteries, before returning them to customers.
  • Disassemble timepieces and inspect them for defective, worn, misaligned, or rusty parts, using loupes.
  • Oil moving parts of timepieces.
  • Estimate repair costs and timepiece values.
  • Repair or replace broken, damaged, or worn parts on timepieces, using lathes, drill presses, and hand tools.
  • Test timepiece accuracy and performance, using meters and other electronic instruments.
  • Perform regular adjustment and maintenance on timepieces, watch cases, and watch bands.
  • Order supplies, including replacement parts, for timing instruments.
  • Gather information from customers about a timepiece's problems and its service history.
  • Test and replace batteries and other electronic components.
  • Record quantities and types of timepieces repaired, serial and model numbers of items, work performed, and charges for repairs.
  • Demagnetize mechanisms, using demagnetizing machines.
  • Fabricate parts for watches and clocks, using small lathes and other machines.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.

Knowledge

  • Sales and Marketing - Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Skills

  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

Related careers

  • Coin, Vending, and Amusement Machine Servicers and Repairers
  • Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers
  • Gem and Diamond Workers
  • Home Appliance Repairers
  • Locksmiths and Safe Repairers
  • Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians
  • Shoe and Leather Workers and Repairers
  • Timing Device Assemblers, Adjusters, and Calibrators
  • Tool and Die Makers