Career summary

Details for Electromechanical Equipment Assemblers


Description

Assemble or modify electromechanical equipment or devices, such as servomechanisms, gyros, dynamometers, magnetic drums, tape drives, brakes, control linkage, actuators, and appliances.

Tasks

  • Measure parts to determine tolerances, using precision measuring instruments such as micrometers, calipers, and verniers.
  • Read blueprints and specifications to determine component parts and assembly sequences of electromechanical units.
  • Attach name plates and mark identifying information on parts.
  • Disassemble units to replace parts or to crate them for shipping.
  • File, lap, and buff parts to fit, using hand and power tools.
  • Clean and lubricate parts and subassemblies, using grease paddles or oilcans.
  • Operate or tend automated assembling equipment, such as robotics and fixed automation equipment.
  • Drill, tap, ream, countersink, and spot-face bolt holes in parts, using drill presses and portable power drills.
  • Operate small cranes to transport or position large parts.
  • Pack or fold insulation between panels.
  • Inspect, test, and adjust completed units to ensure that units meet specifications, tolerances, and customer order requirements.
  • Position, align, and adjust parts for proper fit and assembly.
  • Assemble parts or units, and position, align, and fasten units to assemblies, subassemblies, or frames, using hand tools and power tools.
  • Connect cables, tubes, and wiring, according to specifications.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.

Knowledge

  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Skills

Related careers

  • Electrical and Electronic Equipment Assemblers
  • Electro-Mechanical Technicians
  • Sheet Metal Workers
  • Stationary Engineers and Boiler Operators