Career summary

Details for Team Assemblers


Description

Work as part of a team having responsibility for assembling an entire product or component of a product. Team assemblers can perform all tasks conducted by the team in the assembly process and rotate through all or most of them rather than being assigned to a specific task on a permanent basis. May participate in making management decisions affecting the work. Team leaders who work as part of the team should be included.

Tasks

  • Perform quality checks on products and parts.
  • Package finished products and prepare them for shipment.
  • Rotate through all the tasks required in a particular production process.
  • Shovel, sweep, or otherwise clean work areas.
  • Review work orders and blueprints to ensure work is performed according to specifications.
  • Complete production reports to communicate team production level to management.
  • Determine work assignments and procedures.
  • Maintain production equipment and machinery.
  • Provide assistance in the production of wiring assemblies.
  • Supervise assemblers and train employees on job procedures.
  • Operate machinery and heavy equipment, such as forklifts.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.

Knowledge

Skills

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