Career summary

Details for Tire Builders


Description

Operate machines to build tires from rubber components.

Tasks

  • Depress pedals to rotate drums, and wind specified numbers of plies around drums to form tire bodies.
  • Start rollers that bond tread and plies as drums revolve.
  • Activate bead setters that press prefabricated beads onto plies.
  • Inspect worn tires for faults, cracks, cuts and nail holes, and to determine if tires are suitable for retreading.
  • Cut plies at splice points, and press ends together to form continuous bands.
  • Align treads with guides, start drums to wind treads onto plies, and slice ends.
  • Position rollers that turn ply edges under and over beads, or use steel rods to turn ply edges.
  • Position ply stitcher rollers and drums according to width of stock, using hand tools and gauges.
  • Build semi-raw rubber treads onto buffed tire casings to prepare tires for vulcanization in recapping or retreading processes.
  • Wind chafers and breakers onto plies.
  • Pull plies from supply racks, and align plies with edges of drums.
  • Roll camelbacks onto casings by hand, and cut camelbacks, using knives.
  • Clean and paint completed tires.
  • Fit inner tubes and final layers of rubber onto tires.
  • Rub cement sticks on drum edges to provide adhesive surfaces for plies.
  • Fill cuts and holes in tires, using hot rubber.
  • Brush or spray solvents onto plies to ensure adhesion, and repeat process as specified, alternating direction of each ply to strengthen tires.
  • Roll hand rollers over rebuilt casings, exerting pressure to ensure adhesion between camelbacks and casings.
  • Measure tires to determine mold size requirements.
  • Depress pedals to collapse drums after processing is complete.
  • Trim excess rubber and imperfections during retreading processes.
  • Place tires into molds for new tread.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.

Knowledge

  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

Skills

  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.

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