Career summary

Details for Parking Lot Attendants


Description

Park automobiles or issue tickets for customers in a parking lot or garage. May collect fee.

Tasks

  • Take numbered tags from customers, locate vehicles, and deliver vehicles, or provide customers with instructions for locating vehicles.
  • Inspect vehicles to detect any damage.
  • Greet customers and open their car doors.
  • Issue ticket stubs or place numbered tags on windshields, log tags or attach tag to customers' keys, and give customers matching tags for locating parked vehicles.
  • Perform cash handling tasks, such as making change, balancing and recording cash drawer, or distributing tips.
  • Explain and calculate parking charges, collect fees from customers, and respond to customer complaints.
  • Park and retrieve automobiles for customers in parking lots, storage garages, or new car lots.
  • Provide customer assistance and information, such as giving directions or handling wheelchairs.
  • Keep parking areas clean and orderly to ensure that space usage is maximized.
  • Call emergency responders or the proper authorities and provide motorist assistance, such as giving directions or helping jump start a stalled vehicle.
  • Patrol parking areas to prevent vehicle damage and vehicle or property thefts.
  • Direct motorists to parking areas or parking spaces, using hand signals or flashlights as necessary.
  • Escort customers to their vehicles to ensure their safety.
  • Perform maintenance on cars in storage to protect tires, batteries, or exteriors from deterioration.
  • Lift, position, and remove barricades to open or close parking areas.
  • Perform personnel activities, such as supervising or scheduling employees.
  • Review motorists' identification before allowing them to enter parking facilities.
  • Service vehicles with gas, oil, and water.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.

Knowledge

Skills

Related careers

  • Dining Room and Cafeteria Attendants and Bartender Helpers
  • Food Servers, Nonrestaurant
  • Log Graders and Scalers
  • Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners
  • Meter Readers, Utilities
  • Parking Enforcement Workers
  • Ushers, Lobby Attendants, and Ticket Takers