Career summary

Details for Lodging Managers


Description

Plan, direct, or coordinate activities of an organization or department that provides lodging and other accommodations.

Tasks

  • Answer inquiries pertaining to hotel policies and services, and resolve occupants' complaints.
  • Participate in financial activities, such as the setting of room rates, the establishment of budgets, and the allocation of funds to departments.
  • Confer and cooperate with other managers to ensure coordination of hotel activities.
  • Greet and register guests.
  • Monitor the revenue activity of the hotel or facility.
  • Manage and maintain temporary or permanent lodging facilities.
  • Train staff members.
  • Observe and monitor staff performance to ensure efficient operations and adherence to facility's policies and procedures.
  • Coordinate front-office activities of hotels or motels, and resolve problems.
  • Inspect guest rooms, public areas, and grounds for cleanliness and appearance.
  • Assign duties to workers, and schedule shifts.
  • Receive and process advance registration payments, mail letters of confirmation, or return checks when registrations cannot be accepted.
  • Interview and hire applicants.
  • Purchase supplies, and arrange for outside services, such as deliveries, laundry, maintenance and repair, and trash collection.
  • Collect payments and record data pertaining to funds and expenditures.
  • Develop and implement policies and procedures for the operation of a department or establishment.
  • Prepare required paperwork pertaining to departmental functions.
  • Show, rent, or assign accommodations.
  • Perform marketing and public relations activities.
  • Organize and coordinate the work of staff and convention personnel for meetings to be held at a particular facility.
  • Provide assistance to staff members by inspecting rooms, setting tables, or doing laundry.
  • Arrange telephone answering services, deliver mail and packages, or answer questions regarding locations for eating and entertainment.
  • Meet with clients to schedule and plan details of conventions, banquets, receptions and other functions.
  • Book tickets for guests for local tours and attractions.

Interests

  • Social - Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, training, experience

  • Education - Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.
  • Experience - A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an accountant must complete four years of college and work for several years in accounting to be considered qualified.

Knowledge

  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Personnel and Human Resources - Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

Skills

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Learning Strategies - Selecting and using training/instructional methods and procedures appropriate for the situation when learning or teaching new things.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Persuasion - Persuading others to change their minds or behavior.
  • Negotiation - Bringing others together and trying to reconcile differences.
  • Instructing - Teaching others how to do something.
  • Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Systems Evaluation - Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Management of Financial Resources - Determining how money will be spent to get the work done, and accounting for these expenditures.
  • Management of Material Resources - Obtaining and seeing to the appropriate use of equipment, facilities, and materials needed to do certain work.
  • Management of Personnel Resources - Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job.

Related careers

  • First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Food Preparation and Serving Workers
  • First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Housekeeping and Janitorial Workers
  • First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Landscaping, Lawn Service, and Groundskeeping Workers
  • First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Office and Administrative Support Workers
  • Food Service Managers
  • Recreation Workers